Post New Thread Reply
 
Thread Tools Share
Old 08-02-2013, 01:18 PM   #1
WitchesChild
Pagan Heart
 
WitchesChild's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,591
Rep Power: 131
WitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations God
Default Home Sewing (History and Disc)

Click the image to open in full size.

Measuring hems in sewing class at Ravenna School; 1943
Seattle schools taught classes in home economics, also called domestic science, starting as early as 1904. Most girls took these classes and learned to cook, sew and run a household.

Back when schools taught useful things?

Click the image to open in full size.

Western Kentucky University Sewing class

Click the image to open in full size.
Singer Sewing Machine 1895-1899

Click the image to open in full size.
Jones Sewing Machine, early 1880s

Click the image to open in full size.
Wilcox and Gibbs Sewing Machine, early 1900s

Click the image to open in full size.
Ina Sewing Machine, 1940s
I love the green! (Entirely metal including bobbins, whatcha wanna bet it still runs?)

Click the image to open in full size.
Morse Sewing Machine, 1950s
WitchesChild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2013, 01:28 PM   #2
WitchesChild
Pagan Heart
 
WitchesChild's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,591
Rep Power: 131
WitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations God
Default

The Golden Age of Sewing Machines

No woman could accept the true title of ‘housewife’ if they didn’t have a sewing machine. After all, with the 60’s as part of the ‘Baby Boom Generation’ these little boomers needed clothes. But even more importantly, hand me down clothing, or even clothing that was torn or ripped, could be repaired with a sewing machine. Just doing that alone, was very cost saving, especially if there were a lot of kids in the house.

My mother was a classic housewife, bar none. She made sure dinner was on the table every night, got all us kids off to school every morning, and kept the house spotlessly clean during the day. That was her job, as my dad brought home the bacon, as they say.

However, her pride and joy was the Singer sewing machine (see photo) that resided in her bedroom, that was able to sew the lightest fabrics, yet punch through the heaviest denims, especially when my jeans needed to be patched up, which was pretty often.

Click the image to open in full size.

She began sewing during World War 2 to help out the war effort making uniforms for the soldiers. It stuck with her, and she found that if she bought a pattern and the right material, she could create the most up to date fashions.

This served her well, as my parents were definite socialites, being involved in community service, church groups, 4-H, as well as going to functions like weddings and company picnics. Needless to say, at the fanciest of these engagements, my mother showed up wearing the newest trends in fashion, almost straight off the runway, that she completely created using her sewing machine, patterns, and raw material!

The sewing machine companies quickly realized the connection between the boomers and housewives willing to sew new clothes or repair old ones, and began to flood the market with machines of all types. Principals among the sewing machine suppliers were the Japanese, who made extremely rugged and inexpensive machines, that almost anyone could afford.

Names like New Home (see photo), Domestic, Dressmaker, Brother (see photo w/cabinet and accessories), and some really obscure names like Sew Mor, Stradivarius, and Royal were Japanese staples to the sewing machine market, and they were bought as quickly as they were made.

The basic models of these Japanese made machines sold for $99.00 for a portable with a plastic carrying case. Add another $30.00 to $50.00 dollars to that for your choice of cabinets. Higher end machines might go as high as $300.00 with cabinets.

Singer sewing machines were still at the top of the heap, but other imports like Pfaff from Germany (see photo), Necchi from Italy, Viking from Sweden and Bernina from Switzerland were also on our shores. These machines were generally higher priced then a Japanese machine, but they were also more precise and had more built-in features as well.

Basic Singers sold in the $130.00 range, add $50,00 for a cabinet version. High-end models with cabinets might go near $500.00. Most other imports from the other countries above sold for considerably more. A high end Bernina or Pfaff might sell for close to $900.00 new with cabinet. They weren’t cheap, but their stitching was as close to perfect as a sewing machine could come.

For most of those boom years of the 60’s, sewing machines were hot commodities. Even my mother was enamored by these newer featured types, as she traded in her Singer-which was very common in those days since the sewing machine shop could easily resell them-and got a brand new White for X-Mas. She was absolutely tickled that this White had a built in buttonholer and zigzag, as well as a few fancy decorative stitches, none of which were available on that old Singer she had.

The late 50’s and early 60’s are referred to the golden age of sewing machines, not because of any one particular ground breaking model, although there were a few, but because of the incredibly high sales for any and all machines. Every company that was involved in their manufacture thrived during this time period, as the insatiable need for sewing new clothing and repairing old clothing outstripped demand.

In today’s day and age, sewing has primarily become a luxury item for most people, but if you were a housewife in the 60’s it was almost an absolute necessity more than anything else.

http://www.loti.com/fifties_history/...g_Machines.htm
WitchesChild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2013, 03:46 PM   #3
General_Lee
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Most women under 50 have no more knowledge about sewing than I do. Which is to say, none.

Maybe I'm a dinosaur, but the ability to do those kinds of woman things -- sew, cook, clean etc. is very attractive in a woman.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2013, 04:29 PM   #4
WitchesChild
Pagan Heart
 
WitchesChild's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,591
Rep Power: 131
WitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations God
Default

Surprisingly enough, sewing and crocheting have made a huge comeback with the new generation of young mothers. I belong to several crochet and quilting forums and it is amazing how many of them make extra money sewing and selling from the internet which allows them to be at home with their children.

The sad part is that it was initially attractive because it saved mothers money making their own clothes and home decor, but now that it is popular again you can buy it much cheaper imported. Some of the new fancy machines are in the thousands.... drooling.

You still can't compare the feeling it gives you having made it yourself. I used to think I was being abused when I got pretty fabric for my birthday instead of what the other girls in school were wearing from the mall, but now I appreciate the experience.

The quilts and afghans that have been passed down to me mean more than just about anything I own. One old quilt was pieced from flour sack fabric.

I guess it's women we never hear that much about because politics never come up on those forums, its all about home and family.
WitchesChild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2013, 04:45 PM   #5
Thomas Volker
Member
 
Thomas Volker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: VA
Posts: 37
Rep Power: 4
Thomas Volker is on a distinguished road
Default

Do you knit as well? I saw these baby booties in your keyboard thread...were they made by you?
__________________
OUT OF MY ASHES,I'LL RISE!
Thomas Volker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2013, 05:02 PM   #6
WitchesChild
Pagan Heart
 
WitchesChild's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,591
Rep Power: 131
WitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations God
Default

Quote: Originally Posted by Thomas Volker View Post

Do you knit as well? I saw these baby booties in your keyboard thread...were they made by you?

Yes, I made them. They are crochet though, but hard to tell for the inexperienced eye. (knitting is done with two 'needles,' crochet stitches are performed with a 'hook.') Another fact is that crochet was originally done by men for purposes of fishing nets and other items. Explorers found it on an island somewhere and brought it back to Europe where the women began to use for decorative and useful purposes. I'll have to look that up again.

Plus we all know where the world renowned Irish Crochet Lace originated from, although the chink women have really tried to take it over (what else is new?)

I got new keyboard btw, and thought damn what I really need is a crochet dustcover. If it was cute enough I might actually remember to use it.

LOL! I'll have to think on it a bit, the shape is a tad bizarre. :/

Note to self: Defo need a crochet thread.
WitchesChild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2013, 01:27 AM   #7
General_Lee
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote: Originally Posted by WitchesChild View Post

The Golden Age of Sewing Machines

It stuck with her, and she found that if she bought a pattern and the right material, she could create the most up to date fashions.

Patterns. I remember those. They came on this paper like onion skin and they had lines and arrows going everywhere. Looked like some kind of crazy aeronautical map. And it would get pinned to the cloth and cut along the lines and the cloth sewed together.

My late first wife was so petite -- 5' and about 95 lbs -- that she couldn't buy any adult clothes. The only thing in her size were kids clothes. Her grandmother made everything she owned from cloth and patterns.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2014, 06:49 PM   #8
WitchesChild
Pagan Heart
 
WitchesChild's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,591
Rep Power: 131
WitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations GodWitchesChild is a White Nations God
Default

Do they even make toy sewing machines for girls anymore?

Click the image to open in full size.
WitchesChild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2014, 07:22 PM   #9
Fire Dog
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,627
Rep Power: 0
Fire Dog is a White Nations GodFire Dog is a White Nations GodFire Dog is a White Nations GodFire Dog is a White Nations GodFire Dog is a White Nations GodFire Dog is a White Nations GodFire Dog is a White Nations GodFire Dog is a White Nations GodFire Dog is a White Nations GodFire Dog is a White Nations GodFire Dog is a White Nations God
Default

Know of anyone who's looking for a 48" Le Clerc Loom with a weavers bench, and interesting different kind of spinning wheel and other assorted weavers things....reasonably priced....

Click the image to open in full size.

The Bench looks like this:

Click the image to open in full size.

This is the style of the spinning wheel:

Click the image to open in full size.

There's other things too, carders, lay up things, etc....I'd like it all to go to a loving home where it would be used and appreciated.

Think I'll go outside for a while now...
Fire Dog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2014, 10:52 PM   #10
Icarus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 190
Rep Power: 17
Icarus has much to be proud ofIcarus has much to be proud ofIcarus has much to be proud ofIcarus has much to be proud ofIcarus has much to be proud ofIcarus has much to be proud ofIcarus has much to be proud ofIcarus has much to be proud ofIcarus has much to be proud ofIcarus has much to be proud of
Default Sweet Memories of my Home Economics Class

I was 15 years old in grade 9.
I signed up for the Home Economics class in my last year of junior high.
I was the only boy in the class with about 20 girls.
My friends first laughed at me then later they figured it out.
I love cooking but I loved being in that class more.
P.S I can also cook.

Regards,
Icarus
Icarus is offline   Reply With Quote
Post New Thread Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
sewing


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

 

All times are GMT. The time now is 09:57 AM.
© White Nations™ . All rights reserved.
No part of White Nations Forum may be reproduced without consent.
Design by Creative IT World
Creator Web Team: Creative IT World

Blue Eyed Devils - Beating & Kicking (MP3 Audio)
WN Forum Comment, Video & Lyrics