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Hitler As Told Through The Eyes Of Belgium's Leon Degrelle & Some Of Hitler's Artwork

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  • Reynolds
    Moderator
    • Oct 2018
    • 3033

    Hitler As Told Through The Eyes Of Belgium's Leon Degrelle & Some Of Hitler's Artwork


    My Personal Impressions of Hitler - He Was a Great, Brilliant Man - Don't Believe the Lies, by Leon Degrelle


    Leon Degrelle with Hitler, 1944
    Hitler -- You knew him -- what was he like?" I have been asked that question a thousand times since 1945, and nothing is more difficult to answer. Approximately two hundred thousand books have dealt with the Second World War and with its central figure, Adolf Hitler. But has the real Hitler been discovered by any of them? "The enigma of Hitler is beyond all human comprehension," the left-wing German weekly Die Zeit once put it. Salvador Dali, art's unique genius, sought to penetrate the mystery in one of his most intensely dramatic paintings. "I felt this painting to be deeply prophetic. But I confess that I haven't yet figured out the Hitler enigma either".What a lesson in humility for the braying critics who have rushed into print since 1945 with their thousands of "definitive" books, most of them scornful ... The mountains of Hitler books based on blind hatred and ignorance do little to describe or explain the most powerful man the world has ever seen.

    Not a day goes by, but Hitler rises again in my memory, not as a man long dead, but as a real being who paces his office floor, seats himself in his chair, pokes the burning logs in the fireplace He was not tall -- no more than was Napoleon or Alexander the Great. His face showed emotion or indifference according to the passion or apathy of the moment. Then he would come suddenly alive and launch into a speech directed at you alone, as though he were addressing a crowd of hundreds of thousands ... He loved children. It was an entirely natural thing for him to stop his car and share his food with young cyclists along the road. Once he gave his raincoat to a derelict plodding in the rain. At midnight he would interrupt his work and prepare the food for his dog Blondi. He could not bear to eat meat, because it meant the death of a living creature. He refused to have so much as a rabbit or a trout sacrificed to provide his food. He would allow only eggs on his table, because egg-laying meant that the hen had been spared rather than killed. I wondered, could he physically survive on just a boiled egg, a few tomatoes, two or three pancakes, and a plate of noodles? But he actually gained weight! He drank only water. He did not smoke, and would not tolerate smoking in his presence.



    He took tea in his quarters as tranquilly as if we had been in his small private apartment at the chancellery before the war, or enjoying the view of snow and bright blue sky through his great bay window at Berchtesgaden. At the very end of his life, to be sure, his back had become bent, but his mind remained as clear as a flash of lightning. The testament he dictated with extraordinary composure on the eve of his death, at three in the morning of April 29, 1945, provides us a lasting testimony. Napoleon at Fontainebleau was not without his moments of panic before his abdication. Hitler simply shook hands with his associates in silence, breakfasted as on any other day, then went to his death as if he were going on a stroll.



    Hitler's most notable characteristic was ever his simplicity. The most complex of problems resolved itself in his mind into a few basic principles. His actions were geared to ideas and decisions that could be understood by anyone. Throughout his 13 years in the chancellery he never carried a wallet or ever had money of his own. Hitler was self-taught and he made no attempt to hide the fact. His own knowledge he had acquired through selective and unremitting study, and he knew far more than thousands of diploma-decorated academics. I don't think anyone ever read as much as he did. He normally read one book every day, always first reading the conclusion and the index in order to gauge the work's interest for him. He had a deep knowledge and understanding of Buddha, Confucius and Jesus Christ, as well as Luther, Calvin, and Savonarola; of literary giants such as Dante, Schiller, Shakespeare and Goethe; and analytical writers such as Renan and Gobineau, Chamberlain and Sorel.



    He had trained himself in philosophy by studying Aristotle and Plato. He could quote entire paragraphs of Schopenhauer from memory, and for a long time carried a pocket edition of Schopenhauer with him. Nothing escaped him: world history or the history of civilizations, the study of the Bible and the Talmud, Thomistic philosophy and all the masterpieces of Homer, Sophocles, Horace, Ovid, Titus Livius and Cicero. His knowledge also extended to mechanics. He knew how engines worked; he understood the ballistics of various weapons; and he astonished the best medical scientists with his knowledge of medicine and biology. The universality of Hitler's knowledge may surprise or displease those unaware of it, but it is nonetheless a historical fact: Hitler was one of the most cultivated men of this century. In his room, Hitler always displayed an old photograph of his mother. The memory of the mother he loved was with him until the day he died.





    He could draw skillfully when he was only eleven years old. His sketches made at that age show a remarkable firmness and liveliness. He first paintings and watercolors, created at age 15, are full of poetry and sensitivity. At the age of 16, in Vienna, he launched into the creation of an opera. He even designed the stage settings, as well as all the costumes; and, of course, the characters were Wagnerian heroes. More than just an artist, Hitler was above all an architect. Hundreds of his works were notable as much for the architecture as for the painting. From memory alone he could reproduce in every detail the onion dome of a church or the intricate curves of wrought iron. Indeed, it was to fulfill his dream of becoming an architect that Hitler went to Vienna at the beginning of the century. Impressed by the beauty of the church in a Benedictine monastery where he was part of the choir and served as an altar boy, Hitler dreamt fleetingly of becoming a Benedictine monk. Throughout the years of his youth, Hitler lived the life of a virtual recluse. His greatest wish was to withdraw from the world. At heart a loner, he wandered about, ate meager meals, but devoured the books of three public libraries.



    He had also been taken aback by the growing presence in Vienna of bearded Jews wearing caftans, a sight unknown in Linz. "How can they be Germans?" he asked himself. He read the statistics: in 1860 there were 69 Jewish families in Vienna; 40 years later there were 200,000. In Vienna he had lived in shabby, cramped lodgings. But for all that he rented a piano that took up half his room, and concentrated on composing his opera. He lived on bread, milk, and vegetable soup. His poverty was real. He did not even own an over-coat. He shoveled streets on snowy days. He carried luggage at the railway station. He spent many weeks in shelters for the homeless. But he never stopped painting or reading. Despite his dire poverty, Hitler somehow managed to maintain a clean appearance. His behaviour was impeccable. His room was always spotless, his meager belongings meticulously arranged, and his clothes neatly hung or folded. He washed and ironed his own clothes, something which in those days few men did. He believed deeply in God. Propagandists portrayed Hitler as an atheist. He was not. Read more ...


    My Personal Impressions of Hitler - He Was a Great, Brilliant Man - Don't Believe the Lies, by Leon Degrelle

  • Muh Fashy Bookshelf
    Junior Member
    • May 2020
    • 17

    #2
    What's your thoughts on this? I haven't made the purchase yet due to claims of inaccuracy and forgeries in the reviews. There's only one other book out there from my cognition which features his art, but the author is a rip-off artist who charges up to $30 for books that consist of 100 pages if you're lucky. I cannot support him on principle alone. It would be nice however to have this particular book on my shelf. It would compliment my previous collection of art books quite well.

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